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Tobacco Use and Secondhand Smoke Exposure: Mass Media Cessation Contests

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What the CPSTF Found

About The Systematic Review

The CPSTF finding is based on evidence from a systematic review that found only one relevant study (search period 1980–2000).

The systematic review was conducted on behalf of the CPSTF by a team of specialists in systematic review methods, and in research, practice, and policy related to reducing tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure.

Context

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Summary of Results

Detailed results from the systematic review are available in the published evidence review pdf icon [PDF - 6.37 MB].

The systematic review included only one study.

  • The qualifying study evaluated a multicomponent smoking cessation program in New York City.
  • At six-month follow-up, self-reported cessation was 13.3 percentage points higher when compared with smokers who received only general health education materials.

Summary of Economic Evidence

An economic review of this intervention was not conducted because the CPSTF did not have enough information to determine if the intervention works.

Applicability

Applicability of this intervention across different settings and populations was not assessed because the CPSTF did not have enough information to determine if the intervention works.

Evidence Gaps

Additional research and evaluation are needed to answer the following questions and fill existing gaps in the evidence base.

  • What intervention components contribute most to effectiveness of multicomponent interventions? What components contribute the least?
  • What are the minimum and optimal requirements for the duration and intensity of mass media campaigns?
  • What are the most effective combinations of messages for mass media campaigns?
  • Are these interventions effective in increasing tobacco use cessation in the population?
  • Do recruited tobacco users exposed to these interventions quit at a greater rate than recruited tobacco users not exposed to these interventions?
  • What are the rates of participation in these interventions?
  • Do significant differences exist regarding the effectiveness of these interventions, based on the level of scale (i.e., national, state, local) at which they are delivered?
  • What are the effects of mass media campaigns among populations that differ by race and ethnicity?
  • What are the effects of these interventions on secondhand smoke exposure?
  • Do mass media campaigns that focus on tobacco have additional effects on other drug use?
  • What are the costs of mass media campaigns, especially campaigns that achieve an effective intensity over an extended duration?
  • How do the costs per additional quitter compare with other interventions intended to reduce tobacco use?
  • What is the cost-benefit, cost-utility, or cost per illness averted of these interventions?
  • What are the most effective ways to maintain adequate funding levels for mass media campaigns?

Study Characteristics

The single qualifying study evaluated a multicomponent smoking cessation program in New York City. Interventions included a cessation manual and video, telephone cessation support, and the opportunity to participate in smoking cessation contests.

Publications