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Wendy Barrington, PhD, MPH

Joined the CPSTF: 2021

Wendy Barrington, PhD, MPH is an associate professor in the School of Nursing as well as adjunct associate professor in the Departments of Epidemiology and Health Services in the School of Public Health at the University of Washington. She is an instructor of public health and healthcare practitioners focused on the integration of anti-racist strategies in research and practice.

As a health disparities researcher and epidemiologist, Dr. Barrington’s work focuses on promoting healthy communities and addressing racial disparities in clinical outcomes. She applies community-based participatory research principles to engage marginalized communities in health promotion; collaborates with community health workers; and transforms health systems by optimizing policy, practices, and processes to address racial disparities in health service outcomes, including cancer screening.

Dr. Barrington is an emerging national public health leader. She is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s national evaluation team for the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program and the Colorectal Cancer Control Program. She is engaged with cross-institutional collaborations with the Women’s Health Initiative and has recently been appointed a board member of the Intercultural Cancer Council. The Seattle Section of the National Council for Negro Women has recognized Dr. Barrington for her work partnering with local communities to co-design solutions to cancer disparities.

Dr. Barrington obtained her Doctor of Philosophy in Epidemiology from the University of Washington, her Master of Public Health degree in Epidemiology from the University of New Mexico, and her Bachelor of Science degree in Earth Systems from Stanford University.